OSHA Report; The Cost of Not Protecting Our Workforce

A report generated by OSHA highlights the real costs associated with on the job injuries, who pays them and how this impacts the employee and taxpayers.

Whether an employee is working on a high-rise building or operating an excavator, employers have the responsibility, and what we feel is an obligation to protect their employees from injury. By investing in training and safety, employers get fewer injuries, lower costs, more productivity and an improved satisfaction which often leads to less turn over. But all companies do not feel that way. Many are finding ways to avoid responsibility for providing safe working conditions for their most dangerous jobs.

The report highlights what some companies do to avoid responsibility and what this does to not only the employee, but his/her family and taxpayers when an accident with injury occurs. Shifting the financial burden however does not make it go away. It shifts it to over-burdened worker’s compensation and government systems. In addition, a worker who is injured can expect to make an average of 15% less income after the injury. And while the creating of OSHA in 1970 by President Nixon has greatly reduced on the job accidents, injuries and deaths dramatically, we still have approximately 4,500 deaths every year due to workplace accidents.

As a full-service heavy-equipment distributor, safety is one of our most important topics. Our equipment can be dangerous to operate and to service, which is why we place a high priority on safety for our employees and our customer’s employees. While manufacturers work hard to innovate and make them safer, nothing can replace a well trained and cautious employee.

Report – The Cost of Not Protecting Workers

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Proper Hammer Maintenance and it’s Benefits

Komatsu1aLike all products, hammers require routine maintenance from end-users to keep equipment running efficiently. Montabert District Service Manager Greg Clinton says a little work upfront can ensure attachments last as long as they are designed to, and ultimately save a tremendous amount of time and money for customers. This work comes both at home and at the dealer level.

  1. Daily inspections: Customers should conduct daily inspections of all attachments to make sure hardware is assembled and functioning properly, and to search for any leaks or signs of damage
  2. Maintenance programs: Customers should be sure to follow Montabert’s recommended maintenance program, specific to each attachment
  3. Routine service checks: Customers should schedule routine service checks with their dealer to prolong the life of the machine

“Repairs can become expensive when routine maintenance is not carried out,” Clinton said. “Small issues can lead to very large problems if they are not fixed in a timely manner.” Some common issues Clinton sees as a service manager include damaged strike pistons and cylinder oil leaks from worn bushings, safety issues resulting from missing cap mounting hardware, or even major engine failure from running a breaker with contaminated oil. “In the long run, it’s better to spend money to invest in your attachment now, fixing minor issues, than ruin your machine and lose all productivity in the future.”

Visit our Montabert showroom to see our selection of Montabert Hammers, breakers and other attachments, then contact your local Brandeis Machinery Location for more information on service and parts for your hammer attachments, regardless of the brand.

Komatsu hosts “day-in-the-life” construction career fair for three GA colleges

Chattahoochee Tech, Kennesaw State and Reinhart University students talk technology, job prospects and train on Komatsu equipment

Komatsu construction career fair

Rolling Meadows, Ill., January 31, 2017 – Komatsu America Corp., a leading global heavy equipment manufacturer, recently hosted more than 30 students from three Atlanta-area colleges and technical schools at the Komatsu America, Cartersville, GA customer center training site. Students came to learn about construction-related jobs, as well as how to operate select Komatsu machines, including bulldozers, excavators, wheel loaders, and dump trucks.

As guests of Komatsu America and local distributors Tractor & Equipment, Co.; Linder Industrial Machinery Company; Brandeis Machinery; and Power Equipment Co., students from Chattahoochee Technical College, Reinhardt University and Kennesaw State University learned about a day in the work life of construction and mining employees, as well as current and future job opportunities.

Students also strapped on hardhats, climbed inside 20 foot, 200,000 lb. machines, and for an afternoon, received hands-on training and operated state-of-the-art construction equipment.

“It’s so important to do all we can to attract top talent to the industry,” said Tom Suess, director, training and publications for Komatsu America. “Komatsu and our local distributors jumped at the chance to host these students and their school administrators. I think we opened the eyes of some students today about how technologically and globally focused the industry is, and how bright a future they can have if they pursue a career in this field,” Suess said.

“I had never operated equipment before coming out here,” said Chattahoochee Tech student Chandler Firestine. “It’s been an awesome experience being able to really get inside one of the machines and see how they work mechanically…..especially being a diesel tech. I would love to come out here again and do it if I could,” Firestine said.

Komatsu America Corp. is a U.S. subsidiary of Komatsu Ltd., the world’s second largest manufacturer and supplier of earth-moving equipment, consisting of construction, mining and compact construction equipment. Visit the website at www.komatsuamerica.com for more information.

Brandeis Machinery & Supply Company is a subsidiary of Bramco Inc., headquartered in Louisville, Kentucky. Brandeis, together with its sister company, Power Equipment Company, constitutes one of the largest construction and mining equipment distribution networks in the United States. Together they have fourteenbranches throughout Kentucky, Indiana, Tennessee, Northern Mississippi and Eastern Arkansas. Brandeis offers the most complete line of mining and construction equipment and services available. We are committed to doing what it takes to make superior product support a reality. Our goal is to help you, our customers, to reduce costs and to provide you with complete product satisfaction. Brandeis can help you by . . . focusing on solutions!

 

Vogele Pavers Hard at Work

In July, 2016 Vogele Pavers seen in this video are part of an enormous one-day road building project on Tverskaya Street in Russia.

This huge undertaking included over 300 units including Vogele Pavers and various other support equipment including rollers and haulers. The project required over 8,000 tons of asphalt and resulted in over 32,000 square meters of product!

The street was paved in one-day as a single piece of asphalt which should result in improved performance over time.

Vogele pavers are world-renowned for their performance and reliability, whether here in the United States or half-way across the world, in Russia. Below is a time lapse of the road being constructed. Brandeis Machinery is proud to be an authorized distributor of Vogele products.

Komatsu Adds 2 New Tier 4 Off-Road Haulers

Increased horsepower, reduced fuel consumption, improved access, and all new operator environment

HD465-8 and HD605-8

Rolling Meadows, Ill., November 3, 2016 – Komatsu America Corp., a leading global heavy equipment manufacturer, today introduced the new HD465-8 and HD605-8 off-highway trucks.  Equipped with EPA Tier 4 Final certified engines, these latest additions to the rigid frame truck family combine increased horsepower and the Komatsu Traction Control System (KTCS) to provide improved productivity. These models have payload capacities of 61 U.S. (short)/55 metric tons and 69.4 U.S. (short)/63 metric tons, respectively. They replace the HD465-7 and HD605-7 models.

The new trucks feature a Komatsu SAA6D170E-7 engine that has increased to 724 HP (540 kW) and reduced fuel consumption for the HD465-8 by up to seven percent, and the HD605-8 by up to 12%, compared to their predecessors.  Machine access is improved with sloped stairs and handrails in front, to replace the previous ladder configuration.

For HD465-8 and HD605-8 machines, Komatsu Traction Control System (KTCS) is now standard. KTCS automatically applies independent brake assemblies to achieve optimum traction in varying ground conditions.  Because the system operates without the need for differential lock-up, steering performance is not compromised.

Other new standard features for both truck models include a seven inch, LCD color monitor, dedicated rearview monitor, fast-fill fuel system, an engine compartment light, and a premium heated and ventilated operator’s seat with air suspension.

“With an increase in horsepower and improved fuel economy, the HD465-8 and HD605-8 are designed to maximize production efficiency,” said Rob McMahon, product marketing manager for Komatsu America. “With enhancements to the cab layout and maintenance access, combined with new technology features, these trucks have something everyone will like,” McMahon said.

Read all the new specs and features of these new Komatsu Haulers at our website.

OSHA Announces Top Ten Citations for 2016

Every October, the Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration releases a preliminary list of the 10 most frequently cited safety and health violations for the fiscal year, compiled from nearly 32,000 inspections of workplaces by federal OSHA staff.

One remarkable thing about the list is that it rarely changes. Year after year, OSHA inspectors see thousands of the same on-the-job hazards, any one of which could result in a fatality or severe injury.

More than 4,500 workers are killed on the job every year, and approximately 3 million are injured, despite the fact that by law, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their workers. If all employers simply corrected the top 10 hazards, we are confident the number of deaths, amputations and hospitalizations would drastically decline.

Consider this list a starting point for workplace safety:

  1. Fall protection
  2. Hazard communication
  3. Scaffolds
  4. Respiratory protection
  5. Lockout/tagout
  6. Powered industrial trucks
  7. Ladders
  8. Machine guarding
  9. Electrical wiring
  10. Electrical, general requirements

It’s no coincidence that falls are among the leading causes of worker deaths, particularly in construction, and OSHA’s top 10 list features lack of fall protection as well as ladder and scaffold safety issues. We know how to protect workers from falls, and have an ongoing campaign to inform employers and workers about these measures.

OSHA says far too many workers are killed or gruesomely injured when machinery starts up suddenly while being repaired, or hands and fingers are exposed to moving parts. Lockout/tagout and machine guarding  violations are often the culprit here. Proper lockout/tagout procedures ensure that machines are powered off and can’t be turned on while someone is working on them. And installing guards to keep hands, feet and other appendages away from moving machinery prevents amputations and worse.

The high number of fatalities associated with forklifts, and high number of violations for powered industrial truck safety, tell us that many workers are not being properly trained to safely drive these kinds of potentially hazardous equipment.

Rounding out the top 10 list are violations related to electrical safety, an area where the dangers are well-known.

Their list of top violations is far from comprehensive. OSHA regulations cover a wide range of hazards, all of which imperil worker health and safety. They urge employers to go beyond the minimal requirements to create a culture of safety at work, which has been shown to reduce costs, raise productivity and improve morale. To help them, OSHA has released new recommendations for creating a safety and health program at their workplaces.

OSHA has many additional resources, including a wealth of information on their website and their free and confidential On-site Consultation Program. But tackling the most common hazards is a good place to start saving workers’ lives and limbs.

All of us at Brandeis encourage our customers to engage in robust training and employee safety efforts. The equipment that we operation can be very safe, or very dangerous, depending upon training and company policies.

Takeuchi Fleet Management Service Now Available on Takeuchi Machines

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Atlanta, GA: Takeuchi-US, a global innovation leader in compact equipment, has launched a new telematics system, Takeuchi Fleet Management (TFM). This is Takeuchi’s first step in a multifaceted initiative to know their customers better. Now available at all local dealers, TFM hardware is standard equipment on select excavators and track loaders in the Takeuchi lineup.

With the launch of TFM, Takeuchi along with their dealers and customers will have visibility into their equipment like never before. The new monitoring system checks the health of Takeuchi equipment and minimizes costly repair calls with real-time machine information.

Features include remote diagnostics that reduces service trips by capturing run hours and equipment data. Utilization tracking allows the operator to make decisions based on actual equipment use, while also scheduling maintenance based on run hours. This saves time, parts and money by avoiding unnecessary maintenance. In addition, TFM minimizes cost with the precision to identify the problem as soon as it starts. This allows the service person to bring the correct tools and parts the first time, limiting any downtime.

“We are very excited about the new TFM feature and we believe it will provide operators with increased value, a greater capacity to maximize profitability, reduce downtime, and improve efficiency,” said Jonathan Martinez, project manager at Takeuchi-US. “There are so many benefits to the TFM system, including eliminating any guessing game to make TFM users aware of any issues in real-time. This is a great new addition to our lineup.”

Machines equipped with TFM hardware as standard equipment will also include the service through the standard warranty period. To learn more, visit our Takeuchi Excavators Showroom,  Takeuchi Loaders Showroom, Takeuchi Skid Steer Showroom. Visit our website at www.brandeismachinery.com for quotes and more information on Takeuchi equipment.

Product Spotlight – Takeuchi TB210R Compact Excavator

Takeuchi

Takeuchi updated its compact excavator lineup with the introduction of the all-new TB210R. The ultra-compact dimensions of the Takeuchi TB210R allow it to access the most confined jobsites and perform where other machines simply cannot.  It is the ideal machine for plumbing, landscaping, utility installation, interior demolition, and rental applications. The new TB210R is designed for:

Performance

  • Retractable Undercarriage and Blade
  • Foldable ROPS Frame
  • EPA Final Tier 4 Engine
  • Minimal Tail Swing
Durability

  • Top Side Boom Cylinder
  • Hydraulic Hoses Protected in Boom and Arm
  • Steel Construction
  • Heavy Duty Swing Bearing
Comfort and Convenience

  • Pilot Joystick Controls
  • Armrests
  • Pattern Change Valve
  • Retractable Seat Belt
Service and Uptime

  • Tilt-Up Engine Compartment
  • Dual Element Air Cleaner
  • Automatic Fuel Bleed System
  • 2 Year, 2,000 Hour Warranty

A new Kubota D722-E4B three-cylinder engine powers the TB210R and delivers nearly 22 percent more horsepower than its predecessor, the TB108. The engine oil filter and dipstick are easily accessed through a lockable access panel located below the operator’s seat.

To see all the new features of the Takeuchi TB210R, click here. Then contact us for more information or a quote.

OSHA Increasing Fines for the First Time in Decades

osha logoOn November 3rd it was announced that OSHA would increase penalties for the first time since 1990. The new provision is entitled the “Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015.”

This law compensates for the “freeze” on financial penalty increases that had been in place for the last 25 years. The Agreement allows OSHA to make a one-time “catch-up” increase to compensate for the more than two decades of no increases. The catch-up increase can’t exceed the inflation rate from 1990 through 2015 as measured by the Consumer Price Index (CPI), which will be about 82%.

Assuming OSHA applies the maximum catch-up increase allowed, the current maximum $70,000 fine for a Repeat and Willful violation would grow to as much as $125,000 each. The new act does include a potential exception to the increases. OSHA is allowed to forego following the  guidelines if “increasing the civil monetary penalty by the otherwise required amount will have a negative economic impact [on America]” or “the social costs of increasing the civil monetary penalty by the otherwise required amount outweigh the benefits.” This language gives OSHA considerable latitude to apply these fines as they see fit. After this one-time catch-up increase, OSHA will use inflation rate as a guide for future increases.

Employers may have several months to anticipate these higher penalties, but action on safety should begin immediately. Ensuring your equipment is being maintained properly and safety equipment is in place and working properly will ensure that your equipment passes an OSHA inspection. In addition, this would be a good time to review your safety policies throughout your entire organization to ensure that you are meeting or exceeding all of OSHA’s requirements.

Learn more about our Service Capabilities, then Contact Us to speak with an aftermarket support representative about a plan to ensure your equipment is kept operating at peak efficiency and optimal safety.

www.brandeismachinery.com

Section 179 is Back and Improved for 2016

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Congress has approved much needed improvements in Section 179 which allows companies, like yours, the ability to completely deduct the purchase cost of equipment the first year it is put into service. The new limits are:

Maximum 179 Deduction for 2016: $500,000

This means for qualifying equipment purchases of up to $500,000, your company can deduct 100% of the purchase price from its taxes the very first year it is put into service.

Further, this maximum will be increased annually, with the maximum tied to inflation, at $10,000 increments.

Bonus Depreciation; Maximum Qualifying Purchases: $2,000,000

Once you exceed the maximum deduction of $500,000, bonus depreciation kicks in at 50%, until you reach the maximum qualifying purchases of $2,000,000. For example, if you spend $1,000, ooo on new equipment, you can fully deduct the first $500,000, then deduct 50% of the remaining $500,000 for a total tax deduction the first year of $750,000.  It then begins to phase out dollar for dollar until you reach $2,500,000, where it is then completely eliminated.

Bonus Depreciation will be extended through 2019. Businesses of all sizes will be able to depreciate 50 percent of the cost of equipment acquired and put in service during 2015, 2016 and 2017. Then bonus depreciation will phase down to 40 percent in 2018 and 30 percent in 2019.

Note: The section 179 deduction applies to NEW and USED equipment whereas the bonus depreciation is only available for NEW equipment.

What that means to the purchase price of a NEW, $650,00o piece of equipment? Assuming your company is in the 35% tax bracket, your effective cost, after deductions could be as low as $443,000! See our example on our 2015 Bonus Depreciation Flyer

With Section 179 in effect for the remainder of 2015 and all of 2016, and beyond, there’s never been a better time to invest in new equipment for your operation. Visit our new equipment webpage to view our many lines of heavy equipment.

Note: We always suggest you consult your accountant or tax professional before you utilize section 179 for tax savings. Not all companies are structured the same and your savings may vary.

To learn more about Section 179, please visit; www.section179.org.